Day 32: Habits of “The Richest Man in Babylon”

Today I listened to part of an audio book of George S. Clason’s “The Richest Man in Babylon,” a classic of mid 20th Century prosperity literature that includes titles such as “Think and Grow Rich” and “The Greatest Salesman in the World.” As much as I have enjoyed many wealth-related books, I have always loved “The Richest Man in Babylon” because it really is a personal finance book first and foremost. Personal finance is where I shine! “The Richest Man in Babylon” really drove home for me the point about…

Day 23: Staying in the Sweet Spot of “Important but Not Urgent”

A long time ago, I read a book by Stephen Covey called “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.” In it, he suggested that the things we humans spend our time on fall into four categories, like this: TYPES OF ACTIVITIES HUMAN BEINGS ENGAGE IN: Important NOT Important Urgent NOT Urgent In other words, we spend our time on things that are either important or not, and urgent or not. Some things are not important but urgent, such as taking a random call or answering the door bell, which interrupt…

Day 18: Pursue Your Own Personal Version of Greatness

I think it’s important to believe that you are capable of great things. I’m not talking about doing what other people think is great. I’m talking about pursuing your own personal version of greatness. What is important to you? What inspires you? What do you care about? Somewhere in your answers to these questions you will find it. For me, greatness is closely linked with personal happiness. Yes, I want to be my BEST in all areas that matter to me. Yet even more, I want to enjoy myself each…

Day 11: Morgan Housel’s “The Psychology of Money”

(Note: Our Internet was down for three days, so this post is being posted on July 14, 2022, though I wrote it yesterday, the day I consider it “published”) A few days ago, my wife ordered me a new book, Morgan Housel’s “The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness.” The book had been on my wish list for some time, so I mentioned it when my wife asked me if there were any books I wanted to read. In short order, she, like Tinkerbell, made my…

The Power of Intention: Arnold Forges His Destiny

I recently finished reading Arnold Schwarzenegger’s autobiography “Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story.” There were many things I enjoyed about this book. For one thing, Arnold is an excellent writer (especially for a famous person not primarily known for writing). He brings to life the many people, places, and projects he encounters with vivid and well-constructed descriptions that paint a clear picture and are quite enjoyable to read. Also, he gives deft and insightful observations of his own mindset as he progresses through his life and career. Arnold comes…

Slow and Steady to My First Marathon

My Christmas Day unfolded as follows: I ran 10 miles this morning, came home and after a nice breakfast enjoyed gift-giving with my wife. We then visited with family on Zoom, after which we had an excellent Christmas meal she prepared (the menu: our Thanksgiving meal, back by popular demand!). After this, we both took a nap, after which we played cards while listening to a virtual radio broadcast of a play from a theater my wife shoots pictures for (in normal times where plays are being produced). 🙂 Today’s…

Onward with the Learning

When it comes to money, being an adult has provided an ongoing-financial education. Running my own business, dealing with life’s expenses, and planning for the future teach me much valuable lessons every single day. I’ve supplemented my personal experience with lots of reading: since 2015, I’ve read about sixty-six business and financial books 🙂 Just today I finished reading “7 Secrets to Investing Like Warren Buffett,” by Mary Buffett & Sean Seah (thank you, Sacramento Public Library). The book gives a basic primer on “value investing,” which is what Warren…

Just Happy to Be at a Bookstore

Today my wife and I went on an actual shopping trip that didn’t involve buying groceries. Our holiday-related trip consisted of a stop to make a purchase, a stop at the post office to send out four packaged, and a stop at Barnes Noble at the nearby mall. For numerous years now, I have asked my wife for and received books for Christmas. This year, obviously, has been quite different from years passed. Neither of us had been in a bookstore in at least nine months. This Christmas, I wanted…

Wired to Conform?

Jason Zweig wrote an excellent book called “Your Money & Your Brain,” which I have written about repeatedly, because it is so dang good (!). While it is focused around people’s behavior around money, it’s also an excellent study of the odd behaviors we humans can exhibit because of how our brains are wired. Specifically, the book discusses the reflexive emotions that are built into us, things like fear, greed, and regret. The book is full of great examples of people acting in strange, irrational, or plain stupid ways, the…

The Magical Savings Snowball

As I have written before, I am a big fan of compounding. It excites me to no end to think of the power of money that I have invested growing over time. I’m also very much inspired by stories like Warren Buffett’s, which Alice Schroeder captures so well in her Buffett biography “The Snowball.” In the book, the snowball is a simple image that encapsulates Buffett’s journey to incredible wealth. Buffett used his business acumen, personal gifts, and the power of compound interest (!) to attain a level of financial…